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The Nonprofit Village was the first multi-tenant nonprofit center in Maryland. Our mission is to strengthen the effectiveness of nonprofit organizations by providing educational and development programs, essential capacity building services, back-office operations,and opportunities for collaboration. We do this all within an affordable shared office space, where we house 37 nonprofit organizations and serve more than 300 others through development programs. The benefits and services provided to members help them reduce essential operating and administrative costs, allowing these important groups to focus more keenly on their mission of providing vital services to our community. We have become a first-stop shop for a variety of nonprofits and associations that need to know the resources available and be connected to the expertise that is critical to expanding their operations. With options for coworking and offices leases, we can meet the needs of nonprofits at every point of their life-cycle.


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Chelsea Donohoe
01/Oct/2019

Are you curious about the latest strategies in nonprofit shared space? Would you like to read a “how to” guide developed by respected experts in the field? Check out the award-winning book Shared Space and the New Nonprofit Workplace. It’s not just our team that thinks the book is spectacular – we’ve read it cover to cover. The book has won the prestigious 2019 Terry McAdam Book Award for the best nonprofit book of the year. Here’s a little more info…


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When founder Dr. Kay Glasser began gathering support for the Center in 1985, nonprofit centers were an obscure concept. In our Gulf Coast region of Florida, it was a completely new idea; untried and untested. But as she reflected many years later, “A strong ideal can capture an imagination and control a life.” Through sheer tenacity and belief in her vision, she gained the support of Alex and Betty Schoenbaum, along with municipal and community partners - and managed to convince a consortium of financial institutions that this was a viable concept that just makes sense for our human services community. The Glasser/Schoenbaum Human Services Center opened its doors in 1990, and 30 years later, we are still going strong. We know that human service providers thrive when they work together in a supportive system. We are the hub of that collaborative system, leading to success for those who are making our community a better place.


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Michaell Rose, DrPH, L.C.S.W., Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian, Newport Beach, CA
27/Aug/2019

The role of the hospital is growing. With the continued trend towards population health and diagnosing root causes, rather than only treating the symptoms, hospitals are being forced play larger roles in the health of their patients. As the healthcare industry shifts towards understanding the social determinants of health and adverse childhood experiences (ACES), the previously siloed institutions are no longer the standards in healthcare. The hospital must adapt, and look outside of its walls to better treat the health of its patients. For nonprofit hospitals, looking outside of the hospital walls have always been standard. Through Community Benefit, nonprofit hospitals have been charged with improving the health and well-being of the community. At Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian (Hoag), the opportunity to create a model to address the social and health needs of the community aligned to develop the Melinda Hoag Smith Center for Healthy Living (MHSCHL).


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The mission of the SF LGBT Center is to connect our diverse community to opportunities, resources and each other to achieve our vision of a stronger, healthier, and more equitable world for LGBT people and our allies. Our four priorities are to: >Foster greater opportunities for people to thrive; >Organize for our future; >Celebrate our history and culture; >Build resources to create a legacy for future generations.


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Heather Hiscox, Pause for Change, Tucson, AZ
12/Aug/2019

Think about the last time you created or joined a collaborative project or partnership. In my most recent experience I felt optimistic, excited, and hopeful. I also felt scared, territorial, and skeptical. My hope was about how the collective skills contributed by each partner would elevate the work, and my fear was about how my organization’s name and my hard work might get lost in the mix. I also felt a bit of distrust with some of the organizations in the room. None of these feelings were outwardly expressed as I sat around the table. What we discussed was the work of each of our organizations and gaps that we saw in our community that perhaps our collective effort could help to address. While this was a start to identify new or enhanced potential programs, services, etc., I was reminded of the early foundation-building steps that are often missed in a new collaborative effort: empathy and experimentation. Empathy provides the foundation of deep and authentic understanding between collaborative partners and experimentation tests the behaviors you need to see in order to achieve success. What if we asked new questions of one another and what if we held each other accountable in new ways?


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Allandra Bulger Executive Director, Co.act Detroit and Nicole de Beaufort EarlyWorks Founder & President
05/Aug/2019

In the context of increased community need and funding constraints, organizations often feel stuck when it comes to collaboration. Sector dynamics often pit organizations against each other competing for funding, external awareness, and the vocal community ambassadors that can give voice to their respective issue. And, the ever-changing nonprofit landscape is a constant journey, and one in which individual organizations often travel alone. Many of Southeast Michigan’s most pressing challenges and opportunities are connected and realizing impact requires a collective approach, a diversity of perspectives and ideas, and coordination across efforts. The status quo needs to be flipped to one that moves away from organizations chasing dollars to one that would stimulate community-level problem solving and collaborative action.


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Lauren Andraski and Ezzie Dominquez, Posner Center Denver, CO
29/Jul/2019

The Posner Center for International Development is a mission-oriented community dedicated to making the world a more equitable and prosperous place. We believe that we can transform global development through catalyzing collaboration. For mission-oriented centers like ours, it can be challenging to maintain a clear focus on the needs of the community while simultaneously advancing our own organizational aims. In an ideal world, the facilitation and leadership of your network would always be perfectly aligned with your organizational mission. However, it can be easy to fall out of balance or prioritize the many discrete needs of the community over new levels of achievement and visibility for your center.


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Our mission is to host, inspire, and catalyze social change in the Spokane region. We create and maintain a beautiful collection of brick and mortar environments that enhance connectivity and human dignity. We have a campus of six buildings, starting with the Community Building our pioneer restoration project on Main Avenue. It provides beautiful, affordable office and gathering spaces to local nonprofits and serves as hub for community action. The old Saranac Hotel provides more affordable office and gathering spaces for nonprofit and businesses alike and operates on some of the cleanest and greenest technologies in the Inland Northwest. The member-owned Main Market Co-op benefits Spokane's people, environment, and robust local food system and the Saranac Commons is an open-concept food and retail accelerator with informal meeting, gathering, and study spaces for public use. In all of our spaces we hope to serve the whole person. That means having access to good healthy food, art, welcoming spaces to work, and generally building an inclusive community that knows each other and cares for one another. To that end, we host meals, happy hours, professional development series, and parties regularly to help support the relationships here and to build new ones.


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Brad Wood, River Valley Resources, Madison, IN
08/Jul/2019

We are excited that today’s blog author will be featured as one of 8 presentations at this year’s Sharing Innovation 2019. Like what you read? Register today at www.nonprofitcenters.org/sharing

Stop, collaborate and listen – more than just the lyrics to a popular song from the ‘90s, the Clearinghouse of Jefferson County Indiana has taken these words to heart. Since its inception in 2007, the Clearinghouse team has been through a series of peaks and valleys, always focused on the end goal of creating a larger network of social change. Created as a multi-tenant facility where workforce development entities and community agencies live and work under one roof, the Clearinghouse was the brainchild of River Valley Resources (RVR). Originally founded to provide workforce development services, RVR’s mission has grown to include a variety of services to help individuals become self-sustaining. The organization currently provides education and training services in 17 Indiana counties and employs more than 80 people.

These three words – stop, collaborate, and listen – have been an integral part of RVR’s process to create and sustain a vision of building a network of community partners all working together to help individuals become self-reliant.

It seems counter-intuitive that the process starts with the word stop. But over the years, we have learned that it is by stopping to assess what’s around us and responding accordingly that true magic begins. Sometimes, in such a large organization with multiple services, we can get so caught up in what we are doing as individuals that we don’t stop to recognize where others can add value. It is by practicing the pause that organizations discover there is more than enough if we all sit at the same table.

Stopping also shifts focus from a singular mission to one that is expansive and eliminates the duplication of efforts. Because we have practiced the art of stopping to collaborate and listen, our relationships are non-competitive, holistic, and client centric. We have a deep knowledge and understanding of what each member of our team provides, allowing us to link clients to the services that best meet their needs. We put this in practice by holding a monthly Clearinghouse meeting where each team is represented and has a voice. We use this time to talk about upcoming programs, events, and new partnerships that are mutually beneficial to the mission of assisting clients in becoming self-dependent.

As important as it is to stop, it would be pointless without a genuine focus on collaboration. It is one thing to share space with other organizations involved in similar work. However, it is another thing entirely to set the ego aside and approach each conversation from a place of needing to understand the perspective of the other party. When we can free ourselves from our ego, it opens up a whole new channel to see a clearer picture of the work we are all part of. This clear picture allows us to see how all of the pieces fit and how we are all connected as agents of change.

A perfect example of this is something we call the Madison Model. In Madison, we have a female correctional facility that focuses on re-entry. We sat down with their administrators and the local community college to find a way to integrate these women into our community during their pre-release. Through listening to their needs, we developed a transitions model that helps them learn job readiness skills and earn a certification in high wage, high demand occupations. This prison partnership extends to helping feed hungry kids through the Summer Meals program, and is the only one in the nation that has a partnership with a correctional facility. The women volunteers love giving back to the community and one said, “I love volunteering because I know my kids receive free summer meals back home.”

This collaborative effort would not have been possible without the patience of listening. These out-of-the-box ideas can only come to fruition when we are not dismissive of things that have never been done before. As we teach our students in the transitions class, effective communication utilizes three strategies to positively address issues and nurture a relationship of equals – communicate purposefully, communicate honestly, and communicate responsibly[1]. We have found that listening, when paired with this style of communication, leads to our most successful projects.

It’s easy to say all this, but practicing it is another story. This is especially true in rural communities where resource scarcity is a reality. But as we continue to grow our network, we realize that we don’t have to do this work alone. It is a beautiful thing that we can focus on our piece and trust that our partners will continue to do their part well too. There is a quote by Brene Brown that says, “Opposite of scarcity is not abundance, it’s simply enough.” When we stop, collaborate, and listen we don’t have to solve the problems of the whole world at once. We do what we can with what we have and it is simply enough.

[1] “Employing Interdependence.” On Course: Study Skills Plus, by Skip Downing, Wadsworth, 2016, pp. 135-162.


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