Event Spaces

Facility Management

Online Resource Center

Policies for Public Room Rentals:

NEW’s Conference Room Policies and Procedures, Detailed
NEW’s Conference Room Policies and Procedures, 1 page Summary
Room Rental Policies for the Community Resource Center of the United Way of Houston
Mansour Center’s Rental Policies
Space Usage Agreement and License – The Alliance Center for Sustainable Colorado
David Brower Center Event Contract Agreement
David Brower Center License and Use Agreement
See also Insurance and Liability

 

Marketing Event Space

Mansour Center’s Conference Center Marketing for Corporate Events
Mansour Center’s Conferene Center Marketing for Wedding and Social Events

 

Topics Below

More to come…. 
What to Charge for Program Space
Equipment Needed
Furnishings – Chairs
After Hour Pricing for Venue Rentals

 

Email info@nonprofitcenters.org if you have anything for the topics below:
Operating Procedures, Design/Layout, Square Footage, Other??

 

For Themes and Strategies for Gatherings, head here.


 

What to Charge for Program Space

From an Ask-NCN Discussion, 8/9/16

Irene Lehrer Sandalow, Jewish Council on Urban Affairs
We might have found a space for this project, but we need to figure out the fee structure and I am hoping you can help with our thinking.

The space has three components:
1. Full and part time hot desk spaces
2. Permanent spaces for organizations working there every day, including closed office spaces
3. Program space: this space will be open to community members. However, for two of the organizations, the program space is their office space. (These organizations train people of all ages, including Rabbinic students to study Jewish texts in the original language) One organization will likely use it Monday – Friday from 10am – 2pm and occasional evenings and the other organization a couple of afternoons a week. They are using the largest space on the floor. This program space will also serve as Jewish library for community members.

I have a tentative fee structure for the hot desks ($400 f/t and $250 p/t) and permanent desks, but I am not sure how to calculate the fee for using the program space.

Thaddeus Squire, CultureWorks Greater Philadelphia
One considering in pricing and commons spaces – everything except your desks – is whether you wish to upcharge it to member or include it in the “fully loaded” cost of the desks and transient membership rates. We do the latter, but we restrict the use of common spaces depending the level of members (Full, Light, Basic, etc.). Up-charging internal stakeholders for commons can feel a bit like the airlines charing for baggage – feels like nickel and diming.

The other consideration is whether you rent the common spaces to non-members (outside groups) or retain those spaces as a benefit of membership. To have a membership contract and let our your spaces erodes the value of membership, in my opinion. So we never let our spaces out to non-members. It also keeps the spaces available for use by members.

Erin Prefontaine, The Jerry Forbes Center Foundation
We have a similar situation: 40, 000+ ft2 of office space that includes closed offices, cubicles, hot desks, open collaboration spaces, a communal kitchen, small, med & large meeting and board rooms, a class room and a 4200+ ft2 event space.

We’re doing a couple of things to help with the cost calculations, which for us determine the price calculations:
– We’re working with a commercial property management person to help us ensure our leased space is charged at a rate that is well below commercial lease rates in our city (we’re aiming for -40%), that the rate includes everything (there is no base rent as the building is free-hold title, but utilities, operations staff costs (communications, property management, reception), and contribution to a capital reserve fund and an operating reserve fund)
– We are allotting the meeting spaces to each tenant, proportionate to the amount of lease space each has. We don’t know exactly what that would look like, but an example would be: If you’re renting 3500 ft2 of space, you receive 10 hours of meeting space per month.
– We are enabling the tenants to trade their free allotment of time: tenant A has 10 hours per month, but routinely only uses 6, they can donate their additional 4 to tenant B who only has 2 hours but needs an additional 4.
– Because of our funding agreements/model, we are not able to charge a membership to the Centre, so we are considering all charities in our City members of our community and charging a reduced rate (TBD) per hour to them for meeting space.
– We are charging a premium, hopefully still below market value, to for-profits wanting to rent meeting space.
– We are also brokering leases to those charities that only need large spaces for part of the year: charity A needs 3500 ft2 for 4 months, then only a third of that for the rest of the year. We would then encourage other tenants who are hiring summer students, or part-time workers to lease form said charity to help off-set costs. We are encouraging them to rent the hot-desks (which we will charge out a premium for) for times when they need to: financial audits, etc.
– We are encouraging any charity leaning toward a hot-desk for part-time work to rent a full-time cubicle, as they are cheaper overall.

If you have the opportunity to work with a property management person (I highly recommend seeking one for your board, or those of your tenants), that will really help you determine what you need to charge to be fair to the tenants, but that will ensure the Centre is fiscally sustainable.


Essentials for planning an Event Space

From an Ask-NCN Discussion, 9/9/13

Janna Six, Alliance for Sustainable Colorado
The Alliance Center building in Denver is undergoing a major renovation to make capital improvements AND to expand and activate our event space and make it more useful for tenants and the public. We will have 3,000 sq ft of event space available on the first floor (of the 6 story building). www.sustainablecolorado.org

In order make the event space the best it can be, we’d like to hear from you. What features/ equipment are essential? What lessons have you learned? How do you charge tenants for use of the space? Please share your thoughts by replying to my email. If you have produced your own event space procedures manual, would you be willing to share that too? Thanks! Once we get ours figured out (in January?), we’ll post our event space procedures on the NCN website.(See policy and marketing documents above.)
Pam Brems, Mansour Center
Some suggestions of “must have’s” for event space rental:

  • Event Management Software – not only to keep the calendar but to allow you to run reports, showing utilization, invoicing, receivables, setup information, communications with rental customers, etc.
  • Tables on WHEELS, preferable that bend down, to eliminate the need to lift and stack…tilt and roll, so to speak
  • Chairs WITHOUT arms to accommodate all sizes of participate and allow easier stacking. Also avoids damage to the arms from being shoved under tables and improper stacking.
  • Adjustable lighting, particularly near the front of the room/screens, so the front lights can be dimmed when presentations are being shown, but the attendees still have light at their work stations/tables.
  • Wireless internet – with adequate bandwidth for many guests, each of whom may have 2-3 devices (smart phone, tablet and laptop)

Tom Olivas, Girls Scouts Orange County
Good ideas, I would like to add to the comments below, durable wheels/castors on the chairs are also a great feature and be sure the chair back and seat are of a material or fabric that is easy to clean.

Thomas Gaylon, The Center for Family Resources
If renting space to outside groups make sure you have a contract and get a damage deposit.


Chairs

From Ask-NCN Discussion

Vicki Ireland – Posner Center for International Development, 12/6/16
I am the Office Manager at the Posner Center for International Development. We are looking to purchase a bulk amount of chairs to live in our Common area for daily use as well as events held in the space. We are looking for something sturdy, stackable, and comfortable! I figure this is something that a lot of you might have in your space. Any recommendations on where to purchase at a good price point?

Shelby Fox, Knight Nonprofit Center
I got these recently at Sams club and they are nice and comfortable and only $20 each. I have some black ones that were purchased forever ago and was trying to add to them but some of the similar black stackable ones were over $60 and some over $100 which is so expensive. These chairs were the best look and value I could find. Not sure the picture will show but trying to attach one.
image001.jpg

Rebecca Landau, Urban Land Conservancy
Check with Merchant furniture. They often have very good used furniture. We have been very happy with what we got for Curtis Park and Tramway.
Similar to this: http://www.safcoproducts.com/products/seating/moto%E2%84%A2/xtc%C2%AE-nesting-chair-%28qty2%29-3480bl

 


After Hour Pricing for Venue Rentals

From Ask-NCN 10.23.17

Tarshea Sanderson, Center 4 Social Change
Hi, I am the venue rental coordinator at my workplace. I would like to know how best to price venues at our location after normal business hours. Can anyone give me a pricing guideline. I would certainly appreciate it!

Marc Kondrup, Midland Shared Spaces
We add $20/hour for anything after 5:00pm or on weekends. We don’t have an event coordinator on our staff, so this does not include an MSS staff person to be on site, just extra for lights, HVAC, etc.

Mike Gilbert, The Jones Trust
It is important to understand what your added cost is for after hours use of space. Things to consider:

  • Cost of security or maintenance staffing
  • Cost of utility consumption
  • Cost of heating/cooling
  • Cost of housekeeping (if any)
  • Is the price the same for a tenant partner as it is for an outside agency?

The big thing is how do you staff and what does it cost? You need someone in the building to be able to respond to emergency if a sprinkler head breaks, fire alarm goes off, etc.
Staffing cost is the big starting point and then utilities. I would expect that your true cost for extended hours with 1 staff person is somewhere near $30-$35 hour.


Last updated byNonprofit Centers Network